metis-problems
metis-problems:

metasi-welakw:

Anonymous made a map of Turtle Island’s missing and murdered aboriginal women.  I love this country, but this is one reason why I scoff when people try and tell me how perfect Canada is.  

Anonymous a fait une carte de femmes autochtones disparues et assassinées de L’Amerique du Nord. J’aime ce pays, mais c’est une des raisons pourquoi je me moque quand les gens essaient de me dire comment le Canada est parfait.

metis-problems:

metasi-welakw:

Anonymous made a map of Turtle Island’s missing and murdered aboriginal women.  I love this country, but this is one reason why I scoff when people try and tell me how perfect Canada is.  

Anonymous a fait une carte de femmes autochtones disparues et assassinées de L’Amerique du Nord. J’aime ce pays, mais c’est une des raisons pourquoi je me moque quand les gens essaient de me dire comment le Canada est parfait.

nativeamericannews
nativeamericannews:

We Were Barred From Posting Today! What Facebook Didn’t Want You to See
What did we do wrong, Facebook? ICTMN’s page got banned from posting for violating Facebook’s “terms of services” after  we posted a photo of Lakota grandmothers holding the flag they had seized from Neo-Nazis  who recently made a crazy attempt to establish an all-white community in Leith, North Dakota.

nativeamericannews:

We Were Barred From Posting Today! What Facebook Didn’t Want You to See

What did we do wrong, Facebook? ICTMN’s page got banned from posting for violating Facebook’s “terms of services” after  we posted a photo of Lakota grandmothers holding the flag they had seized from Neo-Nazis  who recently made a crazy attempt to establish an all-white community in Leith, North Dakota.

fatgirldangerous

‘Fat’ is usually the first insult a girl throws at another girl when she wants to hurt her.

I mean, is ‘fat’ really the worst thing a human being can be? Is ‘fat’ worse than ‘vindictive’, ‘jealous’, ‘shallow’, ‘vain’, ‘boring’ or ‘cruel’? Not to me; but then, you might retort, what do I know about the pressure to be skinny? I’m not in the business of being judged on my looks, what with being a writer and earning my living by using my brain…

I went to the British Book Awards that evening. After the award ceremony I bumped into a woman I hadn’t seen for nearly three years. The first thing she said to me? ‘You’ve lost a lot of weight since the last time I saw you!’

‘Well,’ I said, slightly nonplussed, ‘the last time you saw me I’d just had a baby.’

What I felt like saying was, ‘I’ve produced my third child and my sixth novel since I last saw you. Aren’t either of those things more important, more interesting, than my size?’ But no – my waist looked smaller! Forget the kid and the book: finally, something to celebrate!

I’ve got two daughters who will have to make their way in this skinny-obsessed world, and it worries me, because I don’t want them to be empty-headed, self-obsessed, emaciated clones; I’d rather they were independent, interesting, idealistic, kind, opinionated, original, funny – a thousand things, before ‘thin’. And frankly, I’d rather they didn’t give a gust of stinking chihuahua flatulence whether the woman standing next to them has fleshier knees than they do. Let my girls be Hermiones, rather than Pansy Parkinsons.

J.K. Rowling   (via chubby-bunnies)
thisisrapeculture
People often want to “complicate” the statutory rape conversation by talking about the sexual empowerment of adolescents and this and that. These exercises in intellectual masturbation are pointless. I am not the one. I cannot do it. It’s too personal and it’s always going to be too personal. Sometimes, rules exist for a reason and this is one rule that shouldn’t be broken. Deal with it. We are not sending our children to school so they might be seduced by teacher. We send them to school to learn and socialize and begin to move out into the world to be what they’re going to be.

I was a teenager, we were all teenagers and we all felt empowered in our youthful seductions. We maybe were and we probably weren’t. We like to tell ourselves we know exactly what we’re doing, even when we don’t. I try to see both sides of the issue but frankly, on the issue of rape, I don’t give one flying fuck about nuance. Not one. I really don’t.

Suggesting that adults, and particularly teachers, have no business having sex with their students, doesn’t diminish adolescent sexual empowerment or autonomy. It’s common sense. It is decency. The power imbalance is too great. The potential repercussions are too great. Why would we tolerate such risk?
arundhottie-roy

Intersectionality is a very popular buzzword at the moment, and it’s worth defining before we start the exploration of responses to feminist responses to pop culture that come from an intersectional perspective.

Essentially, the concept boils down to the idea that people experience oppressions in overlapping ways, not as separate and distinct entities that can be teased apart and viewed individually. A person who is trans and disabled, for example, does not experience life separately as a trans person and a disabled person, but experiences life as a disabled, trans person. It is impossible to separate out these experiences of oppression, but they are also not the same oppression or equivalent oppressions.

This concept is also designed to stress that, for people who experience multiple oppressions, these oppressions cannot be put in a box and pulled out to be examined at will. They are an integral part of lived experience and daily life. People who do not share those oppressions may choose to engage with them at their leisure. This is a function of privilege: When you are not experiencing something, you have the luxury of deciding when you do or do not want to engage with it.

Intersectionality also applies to privilege, something that can be experienced in layers as well. It is possible to be privileged (as I am, being a white person) while also being unprivileged (as I am, being a transgender person). Self-awareness of personal privilege is a very important and sometimes overlooked aspect of intersectionality, as it is possible to exercise privilege in some settings and not in others, for the oppressed to become the oppressor.

A common problem I encounter in feminism is the idea that all women experience the same oppressions because they are women, and their shared identities as women override any other identities; this focus on women alone of course ignores other people who can benefit from or work in solidarity with feminism, like people of nonbinary gender. Intersectionality attempts to rectify this problem by underscoring that people can experience separate, overlapping oppressions that all play a role in how they identify, interact with the world, and prioritize their social, personal, and political goals.

This brings me to the second and key part of this discussion about intersectionality.

Intersectionality is not enough. There is a tendency in some spaces to believe that using (or not using) certain words is sufficient, that the use of codewords brands someone as a supporter and is a form of activism. This is, to be blunt, not the case. Using the word ‘intersectionality’ does indeed reflect the fact that someone is thinking about this issue, but it doesn’t necessarily mean that the idea has been internalized.

Internalization of these concepts is critical to making concrete changes in feminism, and it’s one of the areas where feminism has fallen woefully short. I see ‘intersectionality’ being thrown around a lot in feminist conversations, but it often seems to take the form of lip service, without concrete action to reinforce it and to show that people really are thinking about the role of intersectionality in the lived experiences of others.

For example, saying, ‘Oh yes, trans women probably have different experiences and needs than cis women’ is not enough. Interacting with trans women to find out what those experiences and needs are, listening to trans women when they speak up, centering the voices of trans women, is necessary. Acknowledging the experiences of trans women is necessary. Thinking about how to actively include trans women in social justice discussions is necessary. Understanding that trans women may have different priorities than cis women, or nonbinary transgender folks like myself, or agendered people, and finding ways to accommodate the needs of all groups, is necessary.

Otherwise, ‘intersectionality’ becomes code for ‘wait your turn.’ Rather than being a reflection of a highly inclusive movement that integrates different lived experiences and priorities, it is used to say ‘just as soon as we get our needs taken care of, we’ll turn to yours.’

The conflict between proud statements about viewing things intersectionally and actually being an intersectional feminist is at the core of many problems within the feminist movement right now—including the feminist pushback to critiques of pop culture that focus on issues other than the depiction of cis, nondisabled, heterosexual, white women.

One cannot conclude a discussion about the role of oppressed groups within the feminist movement without pointing out that there is a tendency to view marginalized people as a single hivemind. The idea is that because people have a shared identity, they all think, act, and believe in the same ways. This ignores both individual identities and intersectionality, and it’s unfortunately very common in social justice communities, where the opinions and statements of individuals are taken as representative of an entire group.

Many individuals are heavily burdened with the knowledge that even when they speak for themselves, their statements are taken as pronouncements made on behalf of the groups they belong to. It bears stressing, for example, that I do not speak on behalf of all people with disabilities, all queer people, all fat people, or all trans people. Members of oppressed groups do not appreciate seeing our words tokenized to prove an argument, nor do we appreciate being treated as authorities on everyone who shares certain characteristics with us.

feministquotes
shrinkrants:

“Oppressed groups are frequently placed in the situation of being listened to only if we frame our ideas in the language that is familiar to and comfortable for a dominant group. This requirement often changes the meaning of our ideas and works to elevate the ideas of dominant groups.”
— Patricia Hill Collins (via tabularasae)
(via theoretical-and-philosophical)

shrinkrants:

“Oppressed groups are frequently placed in the situation of being listened to only if we frame our ideas in the language that is familiar to and comfortable for a dominant group. This requirement often changes the meaning of our ideas and works to elevate the ideas of dominant groups.”

— Patricia Hill Collins (via tabularasae)

(via theoretical-and-philosophical)